Acceptance of the Body: How to Attack a Loving Relationship

Acceptance of the Body: How to Attack a Loving Relationship

As a psychotherapist, I am in the business of hearing how people, especially women, talk about their bodies using the terms hate and disdain. They are not alone. I have done the same thing, so I know how hard it is to be at peace with our imperfect body (have they ever experienced anything else?) Moreover, loving him.
Some people spend time hating the way they are “represented” by their bodies. They have analyzed and criticized every inch of themselves when comparing their bodies with their other family members, to their friends, and to almost everyone they encounter in life, on social media sites, in movies and on television. And consequently, these same people more often than not feel “less than” as a result.

Acceptance of the Body: How to Attack a Loving Relationship

Many such individuals will use almost any means to change what they believe to be wrong with themselves, including crazy food, hunger, cleansing, laxatives, overwork, and surgical and non-surgical intervention.

The advent of cosmetic surgery before the age of 30 has increased exponentially over the last ten years, and the increased use of surgical interventions in women over 40 years also increased rapidly during this same period of time. These interventions include minor procedures (chemical peels, botox, filler) and the main ones (face lift, liposuction, and other interventions that can increase the risk of death).

Unfortunately, some of these people die in their efforts to gain their body acceptance for themselves, and from others. So what needs to happen to lower the number of individuals who seem so committed to changing their bodies? Of course this is an old-fashioned question, but the answer is not as simple as self-acceptance.

Or is it?

For many people undergoing surgical intervention, it changes their lives. It changes the way they feel about themselves, regardless of how it may or may not change the way other people view it, and maybe here we have to draw a line. Right?

In other words, if the person improves their own perspective and they are unaffected by people outside them, is not that a sign of health? The answer is “yes” in some cases.

For example, take a person who decides to undergo surgical intervention because of the emotional pain they experience during most of their lives because of the part of their body they then choose to change, and who never regrets it because they find deep depth. the peace within them as a result. In this case, and many love it, I say “YES,” it’s definitely the right choice for the individual, because the change is for them and not become “more acceptable” by others.

However, consider people who suffer from all forms of eating disorders. They are not usually driven by what others think about their bodies. Instead, they are usually tortured by how they perceive themselves, And, regardless of how others ask them to eat because they are so skinny, they will argue that they need to lose a few pounds in order to be accepted by them.

Thus, it is also a personal choice based on how people perceive their bodies, as opposed to being “pushed” by outside forces. Right? Not.

We are all members of this society, and we have been taught from childhood from various sources, and what is not, is considered “beautiful”. Acceptance of the Body: How to Attack a Loving Relationship

The decision to change our body in any form will sometimes be “infected” by social, health and not-so-healthy values. So, what we need to do is be very clear about the reasons why we do what we are doing to our bodies.

For example, what do we expect from that change? Are we going to change healthy physical and emotional ways? Are we ashamed of what we are doing to change our bodies?

If so, it might be a flag you should investigate. Another flag that reflects shame is silent. Do we hope nobody will find what we do to change our bodies?

As a result, before making changes to our bodies, we need to really think about why we want to make it in the first place, and honesty is the key. Rejection, or in other words, lying to ourselves (and others) or drawing a number of reasons to justify our actions will only hinder the ability Acceptance of the Body: How to Attack a Loving Relationship

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